Editorial

Editorial

Hello everyone, and welcome back to another issue of Jersey Firefighters Now newspaper. I hope everyone is enjoying the hot summer and had a great 4th of July. Just a reminder; do not forget to keep hydrated on those hot and humid summer days and nights. We can always easily forget how hot our turnout gear can get during the 90 to 100+ degree hot and humid temperatures; so, keeping hydrated is very important especially during those long alarms and it doesn’t matter how old you are either, dehydration effects everyone. By now, filled coolers with cold fluids should be mandatory in every firehouse and on every company. It is also that time of year to get out and support the many different fire department festivities, charities, and benefits taking place all throughout the State this summer. Muster Parades and Wet Downs can be a lot of fun for you and your families. But if you are looking for something else new and exciting, I am very happy to announce in this current issue that we have the honor to work with an old school Newark FD brother, Ret. Fire Captain John Fedash from Silver Canoe & White-Water rafting. If you are looking to put together a fun trip this summer make sure to reach out to him through his new Silver Canoe ad and schedule one of their famous white-water rafting trips.

Also keep a watch for his coming soon “Jersey Johns Sign Shop” ad which will feature Custom Fire Department License Plates, Banners, Decals, Magnetics, Art Work Services, and much more. Please check out all our current and newest ads benefiting all our readers. If you are interested in getting your ad or even an article submitted in the Jersey Firefighters Now newspaper, email me now and our fine staff will get
you started. I wish you and your family a very happy and memorable summer. Stay Safe!

Ret. FF Freddy Tenore
Editor-In-Chief
JerseyFirefighters@yahoo.com

Managing Editor’s Perspective

In recent days, many of us in New Jersey have heard stories of police officers and firefighters succumbing to stress and depression, sometimes but not always exacerbated by PTSD. Suicide is one of the most tragic ways to die, because it is preventable with the right intervention and treatment. Ironically, as I sit here and type this message, I see that the date is June 22nd. As many of you know, the number “22” is significant because it represents the number of veterans committing suicide each day. Imagine that for a second? That’s a higher death rate than being out on the battlefield.

Because you are the “bravest,” I know many of you have exercised that bravery your entire life, so I can imagine some of you served in the Armed Forces before becoming firefighters. With that  In recent days, many of us in New Jersey have heard stories of police officers and firefighters succumbing to stress and depression, sometimes but not always exacerbated by PTSD. Suicide is one of the most tragic ways to die, because it is preventable with the right intervention and treatment. Ironically, as I sit here and type this message, I see that the date is June 22nd. As many of you know, the number “22” is significant because it represents the number of veterans committing suicide each day. Imagine that for a second? That’s a higher death rate than being out on the battlefield. Because you are the “bravest,” I know many of you have exercised that bravery your entire life, so I can imagine some of you served in the Armed Forces before becoming firefighters. With that being said, some of you may have PTSD related to your service and coupling that with choosing a career as a firefighter can be a recipe for disaster if you fail to acknowledge it and receive the proper intervention and treatment.

As a veteran police officer, I understand the false stigmas associated with asking for help. I use the word “false” because that’s exactly what it is. In fact, over my many years of service the “bravest” actions that I have seen were when my peers developed the strength and courage to ask for help, so those who stigmatize asking for help as a sign of weakness have either never needed it or are the ones that do need it, but don’t know how to ask for it. Be mindful of the resources that are available to you and keep an eye on the guy next to you. A simple, “How are you doing today?” could be the difference between life or death for some of your brothers and sisters at the end of your hose line.

As I prepare to celebrate the 4th of July, I personally will not lose sight of its meaning and I will do my best to remind everyone that our FREEDOM is our most precious possession, which would be taken from us in a blink of an eye if it weren’t for our brave men and women serving in the Armed Forces.  We owe them our support while they serve, and we owe them our support when they come home.

To those who served in the Armed Forces, I cannot thank you enough. For those who did not serve but now serve as firefighters, I thank you as well, because in the end, both acts involve service to others and self-sacrifice.

In closing, please enjoy your summer and I hope you have all planned a nice getaway or two with your family and friends. Remember, sometimes we need to work hard to play even harder.
Taking a break for a while is often needed more than you can imagine. Be Well and Stay Safe!

Joseph R. Uliano, M.A., Ed.S.
Managing Editor
njbluenow77@gmail.come